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An Overview of Fall Accidents In Nursing Homes

Spending the remaining years of their life in a nursing home may not be in the plan of an elderly individual. Conditions in these establishments may not be conducive to a senior citizen who would have desired to spend the twilight of their years with their loved ones. Unfortunately, elderly individuals may end up living in these facilities and subject themselves to a variety of accidents such as falls.

According to the website of Karlin, Fleisher & Falkenberg, LLC, there are few accidents in the nursing home that can have a serious effect on an elderly person’s health as a fall. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that 1 in 5 falls can cause serious injuries such as broken bones or head injuries. In addition, 2.8 million senior citizens are treated in emergency departments because of fall injuries.

Fall accidents can happen regularly in nursing homes. According to figures in the website of Learn Not to Fall, nearly a third of senior citizens more than 65 years old fall each year with risks of falls increasing proportionately with age. By age 80, more than 50% of senior citizens fall each year. The sad fact is that those who fall are two or three times more likely to experience another fall.

Falls in nursing homes do not cause injuries but when they do get injured, senior citizens are likely to have a difficult time getting around, doing their daily activities, or living on their own. Elderly people who fall develop a fear of falling again. As a result, they will cut down on their daily activities. Less activity would make the individual weaker and further intensify the risk of falling.

There are different risk factors that can contribute to falling. The good news is that these conditions can be changed or modified to prevent falls. Some of these risk factors may include:

  • Weakness in the lower body
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Problem walking and imbalance
  • Use of medicines such as tranquilizers, sedatives, or antidepressants
  • Vision problems
  • Foot pain or poor footwear